For you to work in Italy as a non EU national, you will need a work visa

Over the years, relocating to Italy has been a dream for a lot of people especially for job, business, adventure, starting a new life, family reunion or retirement home. Many people choose Italy because of its rich culture, food, wine, beautiful places and nice weather. Thousands of people move each year to European countries and especially Italy for jobs opportunities. If you are one of those, who would love to come to Italy to work, then this post is just for you.

For you to work in Italy as a non EU national, you will need a work visa. To get an Italian work visa, it is important to know about the main options available and the application process to follow. In this blog post, we shall be looking at the options available and what you can do to get an Italian work visa.

WHAT IS AN ITALIAN WORK VISA

An Italian work visa is a type of Italian Long-Stay visa, also known as a National or D-Visa that allows non EU nationals to enter Italy. To stay and live in Italy legally, you will need a permit of stay called a residence permit or permesso di soggiorno . You must apply for your permesso di soggiorno within eight days after you have already entered Italy.

If you’re a citizen of a country covered by the European Union freedom of movement rules, visa requirements do not apply but you will also need an Italian residence permit for stays longer than 90 days. EU citizens and also nationals from Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Switzerland don’t need a permit to work in Italy.

Read Here: Different types of Resident Permit in Italy

An Italian work visa is a type of Italian Long-Stay visa, also known as a National or D-Visa that allows non EU nationals to enter Italy. To stay and live in Italy legally, you will need a permit of stay called a residence permit or permesso di soggiorno . You must apply for your permesso di soggiorno within eight days after you have already entered Italy.

BEFORE YOU APPLY FOR ITALIAN WORK VISA

The first thing to do is to know when and if you are qualified to apply for an Italian work visa. The Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs has an updated visa portal to check what you might need, depending on your country of origin. The Italian government only accepts work permit applications for a few months every one or two years, depending on Italy’s job market and the state of immigration.

In addition to that, there is also the Decreto Flussi (Flow Decree), which is an annual quota for how many people can enter the country from outside the EEA to work. In 2020, the Italian government set a quota of 30,850 work permits, out of which, 18,000 permits were allocated to seasonal work and the rest assigned to non-seasonal or self-employment (including those converting an existing residency permit into a work permit)

It is important to begin the visa application procedure as soon as possible after the publication of the quota list, because most quotas are filled within a few days. Any applications arriving after the quota is filled, or which are completed incorrectly, are quickly discarded.

WHEN CAN I APPLY FOR AN ITALIAN WORK VISA?

You can only apply for an Italian work visa if:

  • The Decreto Flussi is open
  • The yearly quota hasn’t been filled
  • You have an employer in Italy who will apply for your work permit (Nulla Osta)
  • You are granted a work permit

Please Note:

Nulla Osta al lavoro is an Italian work permit which your employer has to apply for at their province’s (Preffetura’s) Immigration Office (Sportello Unico d’Immigrazione – SUI).

Read Here: Types of visas to move to Italy

The Italian government also issues work permits for foreign nationals who are already living in Italy and want to convert their current student or training residence permit into a work residence permit.

ITALIAN WORK VISA APPLICATION PROCESS

if you are a non-EU citizen, you need to already have a job in Italy and have fulfilled the conditions above before you can apply for an Italy Work Visa. After you have found a job in Italy, you will need a work permit(nulla osta) to get the Italian work visa. The following are the necessary steps to obtain the work visa:

  • The employer applies for a work permit at the immigration office in their respective Italian province.
  • Once the work permit is granted, the employer will send it to the employee and notify the Italian embassy or consulate where the employee will apply for a work visa.
  • The employee will download and complete the Italy Visa Application Form, collect all necessary documents, and submit the application in person at the Italian embassy or consulate.
  • If the Italian authorities approve the application, the employee will have six months to pick up the visa and enter Italy.
  • Within eight days of entering Italy, the employee must apply for an additional permit to stay. This permit is referred to as a permesso di soggiorno, or residence permit. The application can be obtained at a local post office in Italy.

Please note that an Italy work visa can be valid for up to two years depending on the employment contract, but it can be renewed for up to five years.

AN ITALY WORK VISA CAN BE VALID FOR UP TO TWO YEARS DEPENDING ON THE EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT, BUT IT CAN BE RENEWED FOR UP TO FIVE YEARS.

DOCUMENTS TO APPLY FOR ITALIAN WORK VISA

As a non EU citizen, you will need the following supporting documents to apply for an Italian work visa:

  • A copy of a signed employment contract
  • The original Nulla Osta and a photocopy
  • A passport with a minimum of two blank pages that’s valid for at least three months after the visa’s duration
  • Passport pictures
  • A completed Italian Long-Stay Visa Application form
  • Proof of sufficient financial means, accommodation in Italy, and paid visa fee
  • Diplomas and other qualifying certificates
  • A copy of a signed employment contract

WHAT YOU NEED TO WORK AND LIVE IN ITALY

So, as a non-EU citizen, there are three main documents you need to live and work in Italy:

A work permit
A work visa
A residence permit (permesso di soggiorno) within 8 days of arriving in Italy.

I would like to hear from you: What are your thoughts on this subject. You can share your thoughts and experiences with me and others in the comments section below!

It is hard to continue writing post like this without contributions from readers like you. If you enjoyed reading this and find it useful, please would you consider to make a donation of $2 or more, which is the price of your coffee! Your donation will help encourage and support us to continue on our work to support migrants with free educative post and trainings who can not afford subscriptions to get much needed information. Anyone can support us even YOU. Kindly support us today, it takes a few seconds, just click HERE to donate. Thank you!

SIGN UP to the MigrantDigest newsletter & receive updates & tips on news, jobs, finance, entertainment and free trainings.

PLUS, you’ll get instant free E-Book on staying in Italy legally, delivered to your email! This E-Book is guaranteed to help you to be informed of the existing rules to live a better life and to co-exist better with Italians. It only takes a few seconds!

Like this post? Don’t forget to share it! 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here